October 27, 2012

by claybottomfarm | October 26th, 2012

 

 

2012 Presidential Election on the Farm

 

Usually, when the maple leaves turn red, we find ourselves discussing vegetable varieties and mulling over garden successes and failures of the past year.  This year is a bit different.  We care deeply about the future of our country and wish for a healthy and happy community of citizens able to come together to work and solve problems that affect all of us.

 

So, we’re hoping that our CSA is a place where folks of ALL political stripes can come to enjoy healthy food!   We encourage you to reach across this chasm with your family and friends.  By starting at our own tables, we will promote civility in our community.  Also, remember to go VOTE!

 

 

In This Week’s Boxes:

 

Potatoes- Yukon Gold Potatoes.

 

Parsley- Parsley is a great addition to baked/roasted vegetables or mashed potatoes.

 

Carrots – Again, these are sweet, like in the spring.  Cool weather brings out the sugar content in vegetables and you can really taste the difference in carrots.

 

Spinach- If you have a back log of greens in your fridge, try adding a few hands full of spinach to any smoothie recipe.

 

Micro Greens – You can also add micro greens to smoothies, but we like to use them as a garnish for meat or add them to salads.  Some say that these small leaves have a higher concentration of nutrients than larger salad greens.

 

Leeks –   Try substituting leeks for onions in most soup or casserole recipes.  We love a potato and kale soup in the fall.  See below for recipe.

 

See pictures of Keith bringing in the leek harvest below.  I tried to delete the second “vote” picture, but this tech-savy farmer couldn’t figure out how to delete it without deleting the first photo as well…

 

Hot Peppers- Use to spice up your favorite main dishes.

 

Radish – add some color to your spinach salad.

 

Winter squash :  You’ll either get a banana or a green stripped cushaw.  See information below:

 

Cushaw Squash:  If you’re from a rural area of south Louisiana, you probably know what cushaw is — a big, green- and white-striped crookneck squash. The flesh inside is pale yellow, and there are fibrous strands and seeds in the center of the cushaw’s rounded part. The big secret is that it’s delicious, sweeter and smoother than pumpkin. By itself, the flesh is rather bland, so it needs a touch of sugar and spice.

 

Banana Squash:  Banana squash are cylindrical in shape and imposing in size, reaching up to 2 to 3 feet in length and averaging 8″ in diameter. Though the average weight is about ten pounds, a heavy banana squash can weigh up to 35 pounds. Their thick-walled rind, when ripe is salmon pink in color. The flesh: thick, firm, dense and meaty with a true pumpkin orange color. Regardless of the monumental size of the squash itself, its seed cavity holds few and small seeds. The cooked flesh of the banana squash is fragrant, rich and earthy sweet.

 

 

Potato Leek Soup

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 large leeks, cut lengthwise, separate, clean. Use only the white and pale green parts, chop.
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups chicken broth (or vegetable broth for vegetarian option)*
  • 2 lbs potatoes, peeled, diced into 1/2 inch pieces
  • Marjoram – dash
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme, or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • Tabasco sauce or other red chili sauce
  • Salt & Pepper

*If cooking gluten-free, be sure to use gluten-free broth.

METHOD

1 Cook leeks in butter with salt and pepper in a medium sized sauce pan. Cover pan, cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Check often. Do not brown leeks! Browning will give leeks a burnt taste.

2 Add water, broth, and potatoes. Bring to a low simmer and cook for 20 minutes. Scoop about half of the soup mixture into a blender, puree and return to pan. Add marjoram, parsley, and thyme. Add a few dashes of chili sauce to taste. Add some freshly ground pepper, 1-2 teaspoons salt or more to taste.

 

 

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Clay Bottom Farm

We are an artisan farm located 7 miles east of Goshen, Indiana. We are young people dedicated to sustainable agriculture and to providing customers high quality local fruits and vegetables. Our CSA (community supported agriculture) serves Goshen, Elkhart, Middlebury, Warsaw and South Bend. We also have a booth at the Goshen Farmers Market.

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